Compare and contrast

BBC journalist:

The Foreign Press Association:

Hamas is using threats and pressure to prevent journalists from providing objective reports, the Foreign Press Association in Israel and Palestine said in a statement Monday.

The organization said it “protests in the strongest the blatant, incessant, forceful and unorthodox methods employed by the Hamas authorities and their representatives against visiting international journalists in Gaza over the past month.”

“The international media are not advocacy organizations and cannot be prevented from reporting by means of threats or pressure, thereby denying their readers and viewers an objective picture from the ground,” the FPA added. According to the FPA, several members of the foreign media in Gaza were harassed, threatened or questioned about stories they reported.

In addition, the FPA vehemently opposes “a ‘vetting’ procedure that would, in effect, allow for the blacklisting of specific journalists,” which Hamas is trying to put into place.

What appears to attract the attention of Hamas goons is journalists reporting things that Hamas doesn’t want reported. Perhaps that helps to explain why BBC journalists haven’t run into them.

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Anti-Israeli derangement at the BBC

BBC foreign correspondent Matthew Price:

Just a couple of snippets from the article that Price finds so “interesting”:

It is time to call a spade a spade: Israel, as a colony, is a constant source of violence and conflict. It is not an ex-colony, nor is it an accepted part of the world for many. It is a territory in the Middle East under Western occupation, which possesses no political legitimacy now, nor can it ever acquire such legitimacy in the future because it has no raison d’être and cannot create one…

What I propose here is that the flow of millions of Zionists to Palestine be reversed. That the Zionists who emigrated to Israel should be offered a peaceful and generously compensated return to where they came from or the choice of any other destination. And that the descendants of emigrants who were born in Israel be invited to return to the countries of their parents/grandparents, or to go somewhere else as they choose.

Just wow. And if this is what BBC journalists are happy to promote on social media, imagine what they’re saying to each other off line.

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Another BBC Twitter “lesson learned”

Further to this post (also picked up by BBC Watch and Is The BBC Biased?, Naziru Mikail took to Twitter earlier today:

So he apologised to someone, but who it is we don’t know. Still, “lessons learned” exclamation mark!

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One of the BBC’s “impartial” journalists…

BBC World Service journalist Naziru Mikail:

(Ariel Sharon died after 8 years in a coma following a stroke)

It’s OK, though, because his Twitter profle says: “Views here are personal!” He does like to use an exclamation mark!

Update. The same BBC journalist was impressed by a ludicrous claim of “reversion” to Islam (exclamation mark!):

Where does the BBC find its employees?

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BBC journalist ashamed to own a SodaStream

Scarlett Johansson’s admirable decision to sever ties with Oxfam over its criticism of her adverts for Israeli company SodaStream has led one BBC World Service journalist to declare his shame at owning one of the products:

Yeeucch.

Update. Tweet deleted. Here’s the screengrab for posterity:

rolhughes

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