POUNCED!

This from Pounce two days ago in the OT. It received 29 ‘likes’. You’ll see why.

“At the end I link to pieces from the Telegraph, Independent, the Jerusalem Post and Wiki. You decide if there are grounds for BBC Online being investigated by the anti-terrorist squad for promoting terrorist propaganda. To me, there is a clear and intentional ‘import’ to the way BBC Online decided to cover the story:-

Pounce OT 2 days ago, 21:15:42 (amended version)

How the BBC rewrites the facts in which to justify Islamic terrorism.
Jet bomb plotter Nezar Hindawi loses parole bid

A terrorist jailed for 45 years for plotting to blow up an Israeli airliner has lost a legal battle to secure his release, the BBC understands The Parole Board rejected Jordanian Nezar Hindawi’s bid for early release, despite previously recommending it. Hindawi, 57, planted a bomb in his unwitting pregnant fiancee’s hand luggage on a flight from London Heathrow to Tel Aviv in 1986. The device could have killed 375 people had security staff not found it….. Hindawi was jailed for hiding Semtex explosive in the luggage of his pregnant fiancée, Irishwoman Anne-Marie Murphy, then 32, without her knowledge. He was from a wealthy Palestinian family whose village was burned in the Israeli-Arab war of 1967, when he was 12. After his family became refugees in Jordan, he joined the Palestine Liberation Organisation (PLO), became a writer and travelled to London. (Where else? DV) 

So the BBC reports on how a Palestinian was jailed for hiding semtex inside his fiancee’s hand luggage and did so because his village had been burnt down during Israeli-Arab war in 1967. Really?

Here is what the BBC doesn’t tell you in their the Jews can only be evil article:

Nizar Nawwaf al-Mansur al-Hindawi (his first name is also spelled Nezar) is a Jordanian of Palestinian origins. Born in 1954 in Baqura, a village near the east side of the Jordan River, he worked as a journalist in Amman. Although he is from a prominent establishment family (two uncles had held cabinet posts), Nizar’s extreme anti-Hashemite views and his founding membership in a shadowy organization, the Jordanian Revolutionary Movement for National Salvation, got him in trouble at home.

Hang on, the BBC tell me he is a Palestinian whose village got burnt down in 1967. Yet and a big yet, they fail to point out he was born in Jordan in a Jordan village (Now part of the city of Irbid) and that he left Jordan after he took up Islamic terrorism as a hobby. He fled his home country and set up shop in..London where he was recruited by Syrian Intelligence, which is why after he planned the bomb he went and hid in their embassy and which is why the Brits closed down the Syrian embassy and broke diplomatic relations with Syria after the very sophisticated bomb was found to have been constructed inside the Syrian embassy. (It had passed 2 X-rays and was only found during a hand search when El Al security became suspicious of the weight of the calculator. (3Ibs of plastic explosive inside a pocket calculator)

Yet the BBC cannot allow the public to know the full story, instead they weave a sob story about how this poor man’s village was burnt down during the Six Day War and this was his attempt at revenge. Nothing about how his victim when she found out she was pregnant was told to abort, then when his Syrian handlers found out , they got him to use her as a patsy in which to carry a bomb aboard an Israeli aircraft which according to the BBC could have killed 375 people. No, you Islamist shills, it would have murdered 375 innocent people. But hey what’s the truth to the propaganda arm of Islamic terrorism.

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6 Responses to POUNCED!

  1. Span Ows says:

    I also presume there are many more, my Jordanian customer has a map on the wall that kept drawing my eye, it was Israel, but it wasn’t: the borders were all as they are today, the West Bank and Gaza strip highlighted, but it was all in Arabic (fine, you may think) but had a picture of the King of Jordan over the top; he saw me glancing and said it was a map of Palestine.

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  2. sue says:

    I see from Newssniffer that none of the April reports mentioned the bit that goes:

    “He was from a wealthy Palestinian family whose village was burned in the Israeli-Arab war of 1967, when he was 12.
    After his family became refugees in Jordan, he joined the Palestine Liberation Organisation (PLO), became a writer and travelled to London.”

    They must have added that bit in for reasons unknown. *DONT_KNOW*

    “After his family became refugees in Jordan?” Is that accurate? As Pounce has already said,  Daniel Pipes says:

    “Nizar Nawwaf al-Mansur al-Hindawi (his first name is also spelled Nezar) is a Jordanian of Palestinian origins. Born in 1954 in Baqura, a village near the east side of the Jordan River, he worked as a journalist in Amman. Although he is from a prominent establishment family (two uncles had held cabinet posts), Nizar’s extreme anti-Hashemite views and his founding membership in a shadowy organization, the Jordanian Revolutionary Movement for National Salvation, got him in trouble at home.”

    This “People’ story tells the sad tale from the gir’s point of view. It’s a Mills and Boon version, but illuminating all the same,.

    “His story, as it unraveled, revealed Hindawi not so much revolutionary as a confused dilettante: a man who at one moment told a moving parable of poverty in the Middle East and the next of evenings at London discos and casinos. His background muddied, his stories to police contradictory, his very name suspect, he would remain, in part, an enigma to his own attorneys.

    “The relationship was never easy. In the first year they were lovers, Hindawi was out of town six months. Ann thought he was a Jordanian journalist, but “he didn’t tell me very much about himself.” In truth, she rarely asked. In any case, Hindawi was apparently not a very honest young man. On arriving in England about seven years ago, he told friends he was from a prominent Jordanian family (a curious deceit for a self-styled man of the people), but according to a friend of the family Hindawi’s people were farmers from an obscure village near Jordan’s border with Syria. When Hindawi’s father went to London in the ’60s, it was as a low-level employee at the Jordanian embassy. (Hindawi’s elder brother, Mahmoud, moved to London two years later and now works there in the medical section of the Qatar embassy.)

    “Police claim he told them that in December 1985 he formed his own group, the Jordanian Revolutionary Movement for National Salvation. A listing of the group’s goals—though not admitted in evidence—is instructive: “The shedding of Jewish blood is legitimate until the end of the world,” it said. According to one of Hindawi’s statements to the police, when he traveled to Damascus last January to recruit for this new group he was introduced to Brigadier General Muhammad Al-Kholi and Lieutenant Colonel Haitham Said, who he claimed agreed to work with him against their “common enemy,” Israel. ”

    Accuracy and relevance are obviously no barrier. The BBC will get its message across, come what may.

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  3. David Preiser (USA) says:

    More on this from pounce: the High Court of Justice, Queen’s Bench Division, found that many of Hindawi’s claims (NB: pdf file) about his past were false.  The BBC also censors the fact that Hindawi first joined a group trying to overthrow the Jordanian Hashemite ruler, and did not get involved with the PLO until later.From Pg. 8, Sect. 23 (iii):

    His general terrorist activities: There was no evidence of his involvement in PLO sponsored violence. He had joined the Jordanian Revolutionary Movement for National Salvation (JRMNS), a group that wished to overthrow the Hashemite dynasty in Jordan by peaceful means. He had set up with Hasi (his brother) and Salameh the Jordanian Revolutionary Movement (JRM), a splinter group that wished to overthrow the Hashemite dynasty by violence, but it had hardly functioned. There was also evidence that suggested a link to Libyan backed terrorist activities, but these were very limited and occurred before 1985.

    If the nasty old Israelis started him off, why did he first go after the Hashemite rule of Jordan, whose threats of attack on Israel (in coordination with the other Arab countries) led to the 1967 war in which his village was allegedly burned?

    The court found that he lied over and over again about so many things that it’s a joke for the BBC to print his word as gospel. But it helps demonize Israel, so it must be true and they don’t bother to research it.

    This is the kind of thing that creates sympathy for terrorists by seeming to justify their cause. It needlessly demonizes Israel. But that’s the BBC’s editorial policy in a nutshell.

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    • ian says:

      And if it hadn’t been for a brilliant pre-emptive strike in 1967 the Arab countries would have flattened Israel. They had already mobilised and Jordan had even started lobbing ordinance into West Jerusalem. But in the BBC article it’s the “Israeli-Arab” war, as if the Jews had started what everyone else calls the “Six Day War”. 

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  4. magiclantern1 says:

    Great post (well pounced, Mr Pounce!).

    The amateurish venality of the BBC simply beggards belief. You know, I actually do believe they simply hate Jews.

    Fuck them. 

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    • David Preiser (USA) says:

      They don’t hate Jews. But they willingly provide fodder to those who do.

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